While anti forestry industry activists continue to support a retracted*, error laden, so called scientific report claiming fires are more severe in areas harvested for forestry, that support flies in the face of a large body of evidence.**

The Chief Executive of the Australian Forest Products Association (AFPA) Ross Hampton said, “You don’t have to look far to find evidence which leaves the activists’ claims in tatters. In June the NSW Legislative Council’s report: Koala populations and habitat in New South Wales, included the finding that during the 2019-20 bushfires the fire severity was most intense in National Parks.”***

“Also, the Final Report of the NSW Bushfire Inquiry, released last week found that ‘the effect of stand age on fire severity is of minor importance compared to weather’ and that there is ‘no significant difference between harvested and unharvested areas in the probability of elevated fire severity’.”

“Despite this, those opposed to Australia’s sustainably managed forest products industries continue to show support for a retracted report, and seem to be demanding that the only voice governments, the media and the public should listen to is theirs. They have even gone as far as belittling other studies which dare to question the prognosis they want to support.”

“The forest industries are happy to stand behind and support any forest research which shows real rigour and thoroughness, but not these so called “scientific” research papers compiled by activist academics just to attack sustainable forestry in Australia.”

This week the Australian Senate supported a motion labeling the article originally published in the FIRE, as “Bodgy”, and it is time Australia’s research institutes get serious about making sure this doesn’t happen again,” Mr Hampton concluded.

NOTES REFERRED TO BY THE ASTERISKS CAN BE READ HERE: Notes_for_The_evidence_is_in_–_Forestry_has_no_impact_on_fire_severity_Media_Release

The original media release is here: Media Release – The evidence is in – Forestry has no impact on fire severity